Your guests are sure to enjoy our interactive and educational displays! With one of Manitoba’s largest and most diverse private collections of exotic animals our displays feature a variety of exotic animals from around the world including geckos, skinks, dragons, snakes, turtles, tortoises, amphibians, insects, tarantulas, scorpions and more. Our entertaining and enthusiastic staff will introduce your guests to the exciting world of these exotic creatures and give them the opportunity to meet each one up close. Displays are structured to appeal to all ages and we have packages for all event types and sizes.

Display Packages and Pricing
Small Interactive Display Includes:

• 8 species of exotic animals
• 1 of our staff to assist with the animals and answer any questions
• We charge $250 for a 1 hour display, $100 for each additional hour
Medium Interactive Display Includes:
• 12 species of exotic animals
• 1 python or boa
• 1 of our staff to assist with the animals and answer any questions
• We charge $400 for a 2 hour display, $125 for each additional hour
Large Interactive Display Includes:
• 18 species of exotic animals
• 1 python and 1 boa
• 2 of our staff to assist with the animals and answer any questions
• We charge $675 for a 3 hour show, $150 for each additional hour

All Interactive Displays Include:
• Touchable species brought out on rotation
• A variety of other cool exotic items (bones, fossils, skins, etc)
• Informational signs about the displayed animals and other items
• Guests can pay to have their picture taken with one of our critters
• Hand sanitizer

Interactive Display

We also provide interactive presentations which are a great addition to our displays:

• Our interactive presentations are 10 – 15 minutes and go on during the display
• Our staff will provide a quick presentation introducing the various critters on display and talk about where they’re from, their care needs and what they eat.
• Presentations are done from the display setup.
• An interactive presentation is just $25, limit 1/hr
• Stand alone stage presentations for large groups available, contact us for details!

Add Acai, Cleo or Jezebel to your display for $20/hr each. Acai is a 20lb tortoise, Cleo a 7’ python and Jezebel a 7’ boa. Your guests will enjoy these special additions as they always draw a crowd.

Interactive Display Extras

Guests at the event will have the opportunity to meet Pythons, Boas, Rat, King, Milk and Garter Snakes, Turtles, Tortoises, Frogs, Toads, Tarantulas, Scorpions, Insects, Dragons, Skinks, Euromastyx, Geckos, other Lizards and more.

We currently have over 160 animals of over 70 different species but acting as a rescue we have new arrivals almost weekly. To see our complete collection, information and pictures for the species we keep please check out the Collection section of our website at www.PrairieExotics.ca. If you have a special request to have something brought or left out please let us know and we’ll do our best to accommodate. Unfortunately not all of our animals are available for displays.

We’ve been at the Red River Ex the past 4 years along with the Manitoba Stampede in Morris and fairs in Altona, Dauphin, Morden, Selkirk, Steinbach, Winkler and many more. We do multiple displays at the Children’s Museum each year as well as Kids Fest, Kids Fringe, community, fundraising, corporate and other special events across the province. Below are just a couple of displays we’ve done. Our displays are clean, professional, informative, secure and enjoyed by guests of all ages!

Frequently Asked Questions

When will you arrive?
Depending on the display package booked we will arrive anywhere from half to an hour prior to the scheduled start time for the display. This should give us enough time to park, settle the account and get the reptiles ready for the display.

Do I need to pay a deposit?
A 25% non-refundable deposit is required to confirm your booking. The remaining balance is to be paid in full in either cash or cheque when we arrive to set up for the show. Cheques can be made payable to Prairie Exotics.

Are the animals going to scare any guests?
Unfortunately you cannot predict the reaction of every person. Before If guests do not want to interact with an animal they will not be pressured in any way. The display is fun and appropriate for all ages, we do not want to scare anyone but help eliminate any fears they may have!

Are these animals safe for me & my guests?
We have been providing displays for 5 years without incident. All animals will defend themselves but the animals that will visit with you were born domestically (some here at Prairie Exotics) and have been with people all their lives. There is absolutely no reason for any concern, after thousands of parties and appearances as well as hundreds of education programs taught, we have had a perfect record of no incidents. We also have valid liability insurance.

Can you be outside?
We can be outside weather permitting. We need to be under a tent/canopy to protect us from the sun and in case it rains. As long as it’s warm enough or not too warm we can do it outside. We can only be outside between temperatures 18°C – 35 °C.

Reptiles and Salmonella

Abstract – Reptiles are known to have Salmonella bacteria in their digestive tract, which can cause salmonellosis in humans. However, birds and mammals, including humans also frequently have these bacteria present. Salmonella is most frequently contracted when people eat improperly prepared foods. Only 3-5% of all cases of Salmonella poisoning are linked to reptiles. Of these, over 95% are linked to green iguanas and red-eared slider turtles that are kept as pets. Contact with other species of reptiles rarely leads to salmonellosis. The risk of contracting salmonellosis from a reptile is minimal and virtually eliminated when a few simple hygiene practices are put in place: people working with reptiles should wash their hands with soap and wa-ter after contact with the animals and maintain a clean environment for the reptiles.Abstract – Reptiles are known to have Salmonella bacteria in their digestive tract, which can cause salmonellosis in humans. However, birds and mammals, including humans also frequently have these bacteria present. Salmonella is most frequently contracted when people eat improperly prepared foods. Only 3-5% of all cases of Salmonella poisoning are linked to reptiles. Of these, over 95% are linked to green iguanas and red-eared slider turtles that are kept as pets. Contact with other species of reptiles rarely leads to salmonellosis. The risk of contracting salmonellosis from a reptile is minimal and virtually eliminated when a few simple hygiene practices are put in place: people working with reptiles should wash their hands with soap and wa-ter after contact with the animals and maintain a clean environment for the reptiles.

Introduction
The fact that reptiles can carry Salmonella is well known and well documented. This fact cannot be disputed; however, the fact that chicken, fish, eggs and meat regularly found in our refrigerators and freezers can carry Salmonella is also well documented and cannot be disputed. In fact, Salmonella bacteria are commonly found in the intestinal tract of many different species of animals including humans. The issue at hand is the risk of contracting Salmonella from any of these sources. This document will address the issue in light of concerns raised regarding having reptiles in the classroom.

History
Many cases of Salmonella contracted from reptiles have been reported and will continue to be reported. If each case is exam-ined, poor hygiene is the primary reason Salmonella was contracted. As a matter of fact, this is true with virtually all cases of Salmonella regardless of the source. The most common species implicated in cases of infection from reptiles is the green igua-na followed by the red-eared slider turtle. These two species of reptiles account for over 95% of all reported cases of reptile related salmonellosis. However, statistics also show that reptile related salmonellosis only accounts for between 3-5% of the incidents of Salmonella poisoning. Therefore, 95-97% of all incidents of Salmonella are traced to sources other than reptiles.

How is Salmonella contracted?
Salmonella is found in meat, poultry, eggs, milk, and even vegetables. Humans contract salmonellosis by coming into contact with the Salmonella bacteria and ingesting it. It can also be contracted through open cuts. Symptoms of infection include diar-rhea, abdominal cramps, and fever.

Reptiles and Salmonella
Salmonella is found in the digestive tract of most animals including reptiles. The route of infection may be from direct contact with the animal’s feces or indirectly from an animal’s skin that has feces on it. Traces of fecal matter in an animal’s enclosure can also be a source of infection. However, reptiles do not exude Salmonella bacteria from their skin nor do they have a ten-dency to wallow in their feces.

What is the real risk?
First, those that are at highest risk are those under the age of 5, the elderly, and people with suppressed immune systems, as in the case of people with HIV/AIDS. Second, to contract Salmonella, a person must come in contact with the bacteria and ingest enough of it to cause illness or have it taken up in their bloodstream through a fresh open wound. Third, only 3-5% of all cases of salmonellosis are contracted from reptiles. In other words, 95-97% of the reported incidents of Salmonella are traced to sources other than reptiles. These statistics alone demonstrate that the risk of contracting Salmonella from reptiles is small. Looking more closely reveals that over 95% of all reptile related cases of salmonellosis are traced to green iguanas and red-eared slider turtles. That is, 95% from only 3-5% of all cases of Salmonella. Thus, the risks of contracting Salmonella from a rep-tile other than a green iguana or a red-eared slider turtle are minute to say the least.

Simple steps we take to reduce the risk of infection
Following a few simple guidelines we virtually eliminate the risk of contracting Salmonella from reptiles:

1. Wash hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer after touching reptiles.
2. We ensure the animals are clean and take every precaution to make sure no messes are made.
3. We keep the reptile’s environment clean and feces is always removed upon discovery.
4. We don’t allow young children, especially ones that put hands to their face, to handle reptiles unsupervised.
5. Do not allow reptiles near areas where food preparation or consumption occurs.

Summary
The risk of contracting Salmonella from reptiles is real; however, the risk is minute. Iguanas and red-eared slider turtles are the most com-mon source of Salmonella and poor hygiene is the cause of virtually all cases of Salmonella regardless of the source. Simple hygiene practic-es such as avoiding direct contact with feces, keeping the reptile enclosure clean, and washing hands after working with reptiles will virtual-ly eliminate the risk of contracting Salmonella from reptiles. Education is the key to reducing risks rather than elimination of the source. If elimination of all risks is the goal, then we should start with the poultry, eggs, and meat sold in virtually all supermarkets. After all, these foods account for over 95% of reported cases of Salmonella infection.